From La Pointe, Wisconsin, Lake Superior

Today I am writing from La Pointe, Wisconsin, a small town on Madeline Island off the southern shore of Lake Superior.  For many years this island was the center of the North American fur trade as well as the cultural, historical, and spiritual center of the Ojibwe people.  La Pointe is also the center of unfortunate tragedy that left nearly 400 Ojibwe dead as a result of the negligence and ill-fated plans of U.S. Government officials and agents.  The attempted removal of the La Pointe Band and other Lake Superior Ojibwe caused what is known as the Sandy Lake Tragedy.   This is an important, but lesser-known part of Minnesota and Wisconsin history.  Below are some photos from my visit.

Chief Buffalo (Kechewaishke) is buried at the La Pointe Indian Cemetery
Sandy Lake Memorial
Site of the Catholic Church led by Frederic Baraga at La Pointe, built in 1835
Chief Buffalo: Crossing Lake Superior by Carl Gawboy. This painting is hanging at the Madeline Island History Museum and depicts Chief Buffalo’s journey to Washington City in 1852 to meet President Millard Fillmore.
A view of Sandy Lake
Indian Cemetery at La Pointe
View off the shore of Madeline Island